Nuclear Structure

Any structures that are enclosed within nucleus are considered nuclear structure, including any macromolecular structures. (NCI)
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Review
2013
Review
2013
Mutations in nuclear lamins or other proteins of the nuclear envelope are the root cause of a group of phenotypically diverse… (More)
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Review
2007
Review
2007
The promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) tumour suppressor protein epitomizes the PML-nuclear body (PML-NB) and is crucially required… (More)
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Review
2004
Review
2004
Nuclear architecture — the spatial arrangement of chromosomes and other nuclear components — provides a framework for organizing… (More)
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Review
2004
Review
2004
Barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) is an essential protein that is highly conserved in metazoan evolution. BAF binds… (More)
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Review
2003
Review
2003
Most inherited diseases are associated with mutations in a specific gene. Sometimes, mutations in two or more different genes… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
Nuclear domain 10 (ND10), also referred to as nuclear bodies, are discrete interchromosomal accumulations of several proteins… (More)
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Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
We report here that living cells and nuclei are hard-wired such that a mechanical tug on cell surface receptors can immediately… (More)
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Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by degeneration of motor… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common, often fatal, autosomal recessive disease leading to progressive muscle wasting and… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
The XIST gene is implicated in X chromosome inactivation, yet the RNA contains no apparent open reading frame. An accumulation of… (More)
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