Neonatal Listeriosis

Known as: LISTERIOSIS IN NEWBORN 
A bacterial infection by Listeria monocytogenes in a newborn infant up to 28 days old.
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1961-2017
02419612017

Papers overview

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2014
2014
This study describes trends in the incidence of pregnancy-related listeriosis in France between 1984 and 2011, and presents the… (More)
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2010
2010
Perinatal listerial infection is the most common clinical syndrome caused by Listeria monocytogenes and includes abortion, still… (More)
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2007
2007
In Western developed countries, Listeria monocytogenesis not an uncommon pathogen in neonates. However, neonatal listeriosis has… (More)
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1991
1991
In June, 1989, an outbreak of nosocomial listeriosis occurred in Costa Rica. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from 9 ill… (More)
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1989
1989
A newborn with fatal neonatal listeriosis developed septic shock, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and profound hypoxaemia due to… (More)
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1986
1986
Two cases of neonatal listeriosis following Caesarean section are reported. Evidence is presented which suggests that cross… (More)
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1985
1985
Two cases of neonatal listeriosis occurred in a hospital within a two-week period. Both infants were infected with the same… (More)
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Review
1984
Review
1984
Neonatal listeriosis accounts for the largest recognizable group of infections due to Listeria monocytogenes. Fetal wastage with… (More)
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1981
1981
Neonatal listeriosis, a condition associated with high morbidity and mortality, has been reported infrequently in Australia, with… (More)
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1977
1977
Five cases of neonatal listeriosis were diagnosed and treated in a 13-month period. Maternal fever and "greenish discoloration… (More)
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