Nalophan

Known as: Nalophans 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2016
2016
The Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) loss, an odorous molecule of small dimensions, through NalophanTM bags has been studied.The diffusion… Expand
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2014
2014
The aim of the work is to verify the diffusion rate of ammonia through the Nalophan™ film that constitutes the sampling bag… Expand
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2014
2014
The issue of volatiles and odorant losses has already been addressed by different authors. The motivation came from the fields of… Expand
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2014
2014
The ammonia loss through Nalophan bags has been studied. The losses observed for storage conditions and times as allowed by the… Expand
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2012
2012
The present work was performed to investigate the use of odorant measurements for prediction of odor concentration in facilities… Expand
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2012
2012
The SPACE study will assess exhaled breath hydrogen cyanide (HCN) concentrations as a marker of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA… Expand
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2011
2011
Odor from pig production facilities is typically measured with olfactometry, whereby odor samples are collected in sampling bags… Expand
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2009
2009
Suitability of five polymer sampling containers (Nalophan, transparent Tedlar, black layered Tedlar, Teflon and FlexFoil) for… Expand
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2008
2008
Nalophan bags made from poly(ethylene terephtalate) film are often used to collect odorous gases. In this paper, the sample water… Expand
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2004
2004
Feed trials were carried out to assess the influence of crude protein content in finishing pig diets on odour and ammonia… Expand
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