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NAA30 gene

Known as: MAK3, NAA30, Mak3p 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2017
2017
Investigations of environmental microbial communities are crucial for the discovery of populations capable of degrading hazardous… Expand
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Highly Cited
2012
Highly Cited
2012
JavaScript performance is often bound by its dynamically typed nature. Compilers do not have access to static type information… Expand
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2005
2005
InNectria haematococca theMAK1 gene product converts a chick-pea (Cicer arietinum) phytoalexin, maackiain, into a less toxic… Expand
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2000
2000
N(alpha)-acetylation, catalyzed co-translationally with N(alpha)-acetyltransferase (NAT), is the most common modifications of… Expand
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1999
1999
Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to determine the state of N-terminal… Expand
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
N-terminal acetylation can occur cotranslationally on the initiator methionine residue or on the penultimate residue if the… Expand
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1993
1993
The MAK3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes an N-acetyltransferase whose acetylation of the N terminus of the L-A double… Expand
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1992
1992
The MAK3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is necessary for the propagation of the L-A double-stranded RNA virus and its… Expand
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1985
1985
Among 41 yeast glutamine auxotrophs, complementation analysis defined a single gene, GLN1, on chromosome 16 between MAK3 and MAK6… Expand
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1980
1980
Saccharomyces strains of two types (K1+R1+ and K2+R2+) kill each other and K-R--sensitive strains by secreting protein toxins. K1… Expand
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