Melitaea didyma

Known as: red-banded fritillary, spotted fritillary 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2011
Highly Cited
2011
Ecology Letters (2011) 14: 1025-1034 ABSTRACT: Evolutionary changes in natural populations are often so fast that the… (More)
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2009
2009
Dispersal comprises a complex life-history syndrome that influences the demographic dynamics of especially those species that… (More)
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Highly Cited
2009
Highly Cited
2009
Dispersal is a key life-history trait, especially in species inhabiting fragmented landscapes. The process of dispersal is… (More)
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Highly Cited
2008
Highly Cited
2008
We used harmonic radar to track freely flying Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia) females within an area of 30 ha… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
The dynamics of natural populations are thought to be dominated by demographic and environmental processes with little influence… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
1. Recent studies on butterflies have documented apparent evolutionary changes in dispersal rate in response to climate change… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
The Glanville fritillary butterfly Melitaea cinxia feeds upon two host plant species in Å land, Finland, Plantago lanceolataand… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Species living in highly fragmented landscapes often occur as metapopulations with frequent population turnover. Turnover rate is… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
It has been proposed that inbreeding contributes to the decline and eventual extinction of small and isolated populations,. There… (More)
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