MSH5 gene

Known as: MSH5, MutS, E. COLI, HOMOLOG OF, 5, mutS homolog 5 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2011
2011
OBJECTIVE Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have identified several disease susceptibility loci in lupus… (More)
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2010
2010
BACKGROUND The mismatch repair proteins MSH5 and MLH3 play a crucial role in spermatogenesis. We tested this hypothesis by… (More)
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2008
2008
The status of chromatin during spermatogenesis is dynamically regulated by specific histone codes or stage-specific histone… (More)
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Highly Cited
2008
Highly Cited
2008
OBJECTIVE The goal of this study was to determine whether mutations of meiotic genes, such as disrupted meiotic cDNA (DMC1), MutS… (More)
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Highly Cited
2008
Highly Cited
2008
MSH5, a meiosis-specific member of the MutS-homologue family of genes, is required for normal levels of recombination in budding… (More)
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
Ig class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation serve to diversify antibody responses and are orchestrated by the… (More)
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2003
2003
In female sheep fetuses, two of the most crucial stages of ovarian development are prophase of meiosis I and follicle formation… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
MSH5 (MutS homologue 5) is a member of a family of proteins known to be involved in DNA mismatch repair1,2. Germline mutations in… (More)
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1999
1999
Abstract. We have identified and characterized the complete cDNA and gene for the mouse MutS homolog 5 (Msh5), as a step toward… (More)
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1998
1998
In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the MSH5 gene encoding a MutS homolog was identified as a gene required for meiotic crossing over. To… (More)
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