MAD protein, human

Known as: Max Dimerizer 1, MXD1 protein, human, MAX Dimerization Protein 1 
Max dimerization protein 1 (221 aa, ~26 kDa) is encoded by the human MXD1 gene. This protein is involved in the negative regulation of transcription.
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1971-2018
01219712018

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
2018
2018
The electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical studies of thienylene vinylene (TV) derivatives in the immobilized state are… (More)
  • figure 2
  • figure 1
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
2016
2016
Supramolecular copolymers with complex architectures and emergent functions constitute a class of challenging but enticing… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
Is this relevant?
2016
2016
BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor found to be mutated in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and plays key roles in the maintenance of… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
Is this relevant?
2011
2011
Transport of many proteins to extracytoplasmic locations occurs via the general secretion (Sec) pathway. In Escherichia coli… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • table 1
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
Is this relevant?
2009
2009
MAX dimerization protein 1 (MAD1) is a transcription suppressor that antagonizes MYC-mediated transcription activation, and the… (More)
Is this relevant?
2008
2008
The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) is a dimeric G protein-coupled receptor expressed in melanocytes, where it regulates the… (More)
Is this relevant?
2005
2005
Palladium-catalyzed terminal alkyne dimerization, through oxidative homocoupling, is a useful approach to the synthesis of… (More)
Is this relevant?
1972
1972
Highly purified mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes) have been obtained from the yeast Candida utilis. Sedimentation analysis… (More)
  • figure 3
  • figure 5
  • figure 13
  • figure 16
  • figure 15
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
1971
Highly Cited
1971
It is pointed out that translational and (overall) rotational motions provide the important entropic driving force for enzymic… (More)
  • table 1
  • table 2
Is this relevant?