Lucilia <blowfly>

Known as: Bufolucilia, Lucilia, Phaenicia 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2009
2009
fatty acids are considered to be effective components to promote wound healing and Lucilia sericata larvae are applied clinically… (More)
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2009
2009
Lucilia sericata maggots are used world-wide in biosurgery for the medical treatment of nonhealing wounds because they ingest… (More)
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2008
2008
The application of Lucilia sericata larvae to chronic, infected wounds results in the rapid elimination of infecting… (More)
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2006
2006
Forensic entomologists rely on laboratory growth data to estimate the time of blow fly colonization on human remains. Several… (More)
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
The antibacterial properties of secretions aseptically collected from larvae of the greenbottle fly Lucilia sericata (Meigen… (More)
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2004
2004
Response properties of the identified H1-neurone upon monocular stimulation were investigated by means of extracellular… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Developmental behavior of eggs, larva and pupa of the blowfly species Lucilia sericata (Meigen) were studied under 10 different… (More)
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Review
2001
Review
2001
Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) was first introduced in the US in 1931 and was routinely used there until mid-1940s in over 300… (More)
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2000
2000
Maggot therapy: an alternative for wound infection I maggots remind you of fly-blown meat and rotting corpses, think again. For… (More)
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Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
The potential growth stimulating effects of the blow fly, Phaenicia sericata, on mammalian tissue were assessed by exposing human… (More)
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