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Lawsonia inermis

Known as: Henna, Henna Plants, Lawsonia inermis (Henna) Leaf Extract 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2016
2016
ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE Chromolaena odorata, Tithonia diversifolia and Lawsonia inermis are medicinal plants used in… Expand
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Highly Cited
2014
Highly Cited
2014
AIM The goal of our study was to determine the effects of Lawsonia inermis (L. inermis) in mice, in which hyperthyroidism had… Expand
Highly Cited
2011
Highly Cited
2011
A central mechanism in cellular defence against oxidative or electrophilic stress is mediated by transcriptional induction of… Expand
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2011
2011
Lawsonia inermis Linn. (Mehandi) is cultivated as cash crop in India particularly in Sojat area of Pali district, Rajasthan… Expand
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2009
2009
Microbial communities in an acidic hot spring, namely Kawah Hujan B, at Kamojang geothermal field, West Java-Indonesia was… Expand
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2008
2008
INTRODUCTION Lawsonia inermis L. is a natural red colouring agent, commonly named "Henna", which is used to dye skin and hair… Expand
Review
2008
Review
2008
Temporary henna tattoos are becoming increasingly popular among Western tourists during summer holidays, especially children… Expand
Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
The ethanol extract of Lawsonia inermis (200 mg/kg/day) was used to evaluate the wound healing activity on rats using excision… Expand
2007
2007
Temporary henna tattoos have become increasingly popular as a safe alternative to permanent tattoos among American and European… Expand
Highly Cited
1990
Highly Cited
1990
The tuberculostatic activity of the herb henna (Lawsonia inermis Linn.) was tested in vitro and in vivo. On Lowenstein Jensen… Expand