Lacrimogenic gas

Known as: Gas, Tear, Tear Gases, Tear gas 
Gases that irritate the eyes, throat, or skin. Severe lacrimation develops upon irritation of the eyes.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2011
2011
AIM Gunshot wounds to the head are rare in Europe. They may be inflicted by low-velocity handguns, captive bolt guns and tear gas… (More)
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Highly Cited
2009
Highly Cited
2009
Although it is well established that changes in endothelial intracellular [Ca(2+)] regulate endothelium-dependent vasodilatory… (More)
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Highly Cited
2009
Highly Cited
2009
The release of methyl isocyanate in Bhopal, India, caused the worst industrial accident in history. Exposures to industrial… (More)
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2008
2008
The respiratory tract is innervated by primary afferent sensory neurons that respond to mechanical and chemical stimuli (Taylor… (More)
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Review
2006
Review
2006
TRP cation channels transduce mechanical, thermal, and pain-related inflammatory signals. In this issue of Cell, it is reported… (More)
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2005
2005
Ortho-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile (CS) "tear gas" is a lacrimating riot control agent causing eye irritation, excessive… (More)
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Review
2003
Review
2003
Irritant incapacitants, also called riot control agents, lacrimators and tear gases, are aerosol-dispersed chemicals that produce… (More)
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1994
1994
It is known from experimental studies that antigenic potency and the concentration of antigen determine whether exposure to an… (More)
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Review
1989
Review
1989
Tear gas has gained widespread acceptance as a means of controlling civilian crowds and subduing barricaded criminals. The most… (More)
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