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LAPP protein, Haementeria officinalis

Known as: leech antiplatelet protein, Haementeria officinalis 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2007
2007
The  most  important   environmental    factors   influencing   the  number and  kind of leeches  in a given  habitat  are:  food… Expand
Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
1. Crude salivary gland extract of the giant Amazon leech, Haementeria ghilianii, contains an inhibitor of plasma factor XIIIa. 2… Expand
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1997
1997
The blood-sucking leech, Haementeria ghilianii, has evolved a number of agents that attenuate haemostasis. Recently we have… Expand
1991
1991
The giant Amazon leech Haementeria ghilianii feeds by inserting an exceedingly long tubular proboscis (up to 10 cm) deep into its… Expand
1988
1988
The giant anterior salivary gland cells from the large mammalian blood‐sucking, glossiphoniid leech, Haementeria ghilianii, can… Expand
Highly Cited
1987
Highly Cited
1987
The nervous system of the glossiphoniid leech includes segmentally iterated neurons that contain serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine… Expand
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1984
1984
The leech Haementeria ghilianii contains the anticoagulant hementin in its salivary glands, which renders ingested blood… Expand
1981
1981
Abstract The giant leech, Haementeria ghilianii, originating from French Guyana, has two pairs of salivary glands. From the… Expand
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Highly Cited
1980
Highly Cited
1980
  • E. Macagno
  • The Journal of comparative neurology
  • 1980
  • Corpus ID: 36325234
The number of neurons and their distribution were determined for specific segmental ganglia from the nerve cord of four different… Expand