Key signature

In cryptography, a key signature is the result of a third-party applying a cryptographic signature to a representation of a cryptographic key. This… (More)
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Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1987-2016
051019872016

Papers overview

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2009
2009
On-line/Off-line signatures are useful in many applications where the signer has a very limited response time once the message is… (More)
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2006
2006
There are many applications in which it is necessary to transmit authenticatable messages while achieving certain privacy goals… (More)
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
Balanced Oil and Vinegar signature schemes and the unbalanced Oil and Vinegar signature schemes are public key signature schemes… (More)
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2005
2005
It is well known that excessive computational demands of public key cryptography have made its use limited especially when… (More)
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2005
2005
In 2003, Tseng et al. proposed a self-certified public key signature with message recovery, which gives two advantages: one is… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
We develop an eecient identity based signature scheme based on pairings whose security relies on the hardness of the Diie-Hellman… (More)
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1997
1997
This paper describes an approach to module composition by executing \module expressions" to build systems out of component… (More)
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1997
1997
This paper describes an approach to module composition by executing \module expressions" to build systems out of component… (More)
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Highly Cited
1993
Highly Cited
1993
Many public key cryptographic schemes (such as cubic RSA) are based on low degree polynomials whose inverses are high degree… (More)
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1993
1993
Many public key cryptographic schemes (such a s c u b i c RSA) are based on low degree polynomials whose inverses are high degree… (More)
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