Iris neovascularization

Known as: New blood vessel formation in iris, Rubeosis iridis 
New growth of vessels on the surface of the iris. [DDD:ncarter]
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2008
2008
PURPOSE To report the biologic effect of intracameral bevacizumab in patients with iris neovascularization secondary to… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
PURPOSE To assess the short-term safety and efficacy of intravitreal injection of bevacizumab for iris neovascularization (INV… (More)
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2001
2001
PURPOSE To analyze the incidence of iris neovascularization after vitrectomy combined with phacoemulsification and intraocular… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
OBJECTIVE To determine if the angiogenic peptide vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is required for retinal ischemia… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
OBJECTIVE To determine whether the angiogenic peptide vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is sufficient to produce iris… (More)
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Highly Cited
1995
Highly Cited
1995
BACKGROUND It is generally assumed that unwarranted, excessive neovascularization of the retina and iris is a direct response to… (More)
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Highly Cited
1994
Highly Cited
1994
Ischemia often precedes neovascularization. In ocular neovascularization, such as occurs in diabetic retinopathy, a diffusible… (More)
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1993
1993
BACKGROUND Intraocular neovascularization leads to visual loss in many eye diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related… (More)
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1991
1991
Photodynamic therapy using chloroaluminum sulfonated phthalocyanine (CASPc) effectively closed experimental iris… (More)
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