Head/tail Breaks

Head/tail breaks is a new clustering algorithm scheme for data with a heavy-tailed distribution such as power laws and lognormal distributions. The… (More)
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Topic mentions per year

2015-2017
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Papers overview

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2017
2017
Nowadays as the world population has become more interconnected and is relying on faster transportation methods, simplified… (More)
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2017
2017
A city is a whole, as are all cities in a country. Within a whole, individual cities possess different degrees of wholeness… (More)
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2016
2016
The wholeness, conceived and developed by Christopher Alexander, is what exists to some degree or other in space and matter, and… (More)
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2015
2015
The most common method is used and claimed excellent in statistical mapping is Jenk's Natural Breaks, while Head-tail Breaks is a… (More)
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2015
2015
OpenStreetMap (OSM) constitutes an unprecedented, free, geographical information source contributed by millions of individuals… (More)
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2015
2015
This paper introduces a new concept of least community that is as homogeneous as a random graph, and develops a new community… (More)
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2015
2015
The ht-index is a recently proposed tool for capturing dynamic views of the evolution process of geographic features, but the… (More)
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2015
2015
  • Bin Jiang
  • International Journal of Geographical Information…
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According to Christopher Alexander’s theory of centers, a whole comprises numerous, recursively defined centers for things or… (More)
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