Georychus capensis

Known as: Cape mole rat 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1985-2018
012319852018

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
2018
2018
The subterranean niche harbours animals with extreme adaptations. These adaptations decrease the vagility of taxa and, along with… (More)
Is this relevant?
2014
2014
African mole-rats (family Bathyergidae) are small to medium sized, long-lived, and strictly subterranean rodents that became… (More)
  • figure 1
  • table 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
Is this relevant?
2013
2013
A large number of laboratory and field based studies are being carried out on mole-rats, both in our research group and others… (More)
  • table 1
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
Is this relevant?
2010
2010
The seasonality of wild caught Cape mole-rats was investigated, focusing on endocrine, neuroendocrine and neuroanatomical… (More)
  • figure 1.1
  • figure 1.2
  • figure 1.3
  • figure 2.1
  • figure 2.2
Is this relevant?
2008
2008
Mole-rat species within the family Bathyergidae exhibit a wide range of reproductive strategies and social systems. Various forms… (More)
  • figure 4
Is this relevant?
2006
2006
Different reproductive strategies of males and females may lead to the evolution of differences in their energetic costs of… (More)
  • figure 1
  • table 1
  • figure 2
Is this relevant?
2006
2006
Supervisor: Professor N.C. Bennett, Department of Zoology and Entomology,University of Pretoria, Pretoria, 0002, South Africa… (More)
  • figure 2.1
  • figure 2.2
  • table 2.1
  • figure 2.3
  • table 2.2
Is this relevant?
1997
1997
Recent studies of the visual system of animal species that live in a subterranean environment show not only regressive but also… (More)
Is this relevant?
1997
1997
Behavioral adaptations exhibited by two African fossorial mammals for the reception of vibrational signals are discussed. The… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
1985
1985
At 22°C the resting oxygen consumption of G. capensis is 1.13±0.05 cm3O2·g-1·h-1 (mean± S.E.). In loose sandy soil the burrowing… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • table 1
  • table 2
  • figure 3
Is this relevant?