Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus

Known as: GEFS+ 
A rare, genetically heterogeneous disorder caused by mutations in the SCN1A, GABRG2, GABRD, SCN9A, or STX1B genes. It is characterized by early… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
2011
2011
Mutations in the neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel genes SCN1A and SCN2A are associated with inherited epilepsies, including… (More)
Is this relevant?
Review
2009
Review
2009
Dravet syndrome and genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) can both arise due to mutations of SCN1A, the gene… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
Recent findings from studies of two families have shown that mutations in the GABA(A)-receptor gamma2 subunit are associated with… (More)
Is this relevant?
2002
2002
Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS(+)) is an important childhood genetic epilepsy syndrome with heterogeneous… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is a familial epilepsy syndrome characterized by the presence of febrile… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
BACKGROUND Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by febrile… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Two mutations that cause generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) have been identified previously in the SCN1A… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • table 1
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI) is a rare disorder that occurs in isolated patients. The disease is characterized by… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
We examined the phenotypic variation and clinical genetics in nine families with generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
Febrile seizures affect approximately 3% of all children under six years of age and are by far the most common seizure disorder… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?