Gelastic Epilepsy

Known as: Epilepsy, gelastic, Gelastic Epilepsies, Gelastic seizures 
A type of seizure characterized by laughing or an outburst of laughing as a major feature. [HPO:probinson]
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2010
2010
OBJECTIVE To present a case of intractable cryptogenic gelastic epilepsy with ictal video-EEG to localize the seizure focus… (More)
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2005
2005
PURPOSE To delineate the clinical spectrum and patterns of evolution of epilepsy with gelastic seizures related to hypothalamic… (More)
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Review
2001
Review
2001
OBJECTIVE Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) are associated with precocious puberty and gelastic epilepsy; the seizures are often… (More)
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1999
1999
PURPOSE To describe the etiology, characteristics, and clinical evolution of epilepsy in patients with gelastic seizures (GSs… (More)
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1998
1998
BACKGROUND Patients with hypothalamic hamartomas present with epileptic attacks of laughter and later experience multiple seizure… (More)
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Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
Hypothalamic hamartomas and gelastic seizures are often associated with cognitive deterioration, behavioral problems, and poor… (More)
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1997
1997
Gelastic epilepsy, or ictal laughter, is a relatively uncommon type of seizure which may occur singly or, more frequently, with… (More)
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Highly Cited
1994
Highly Cited
1994
This study presents six patients with hypothalamic hamartomas diagnosed on the basis of magnetic resonance imaging. Histological… (More)
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Highly Cited
1993
Highly Cited
1993
Little is known about what pathways subserve mirth and its expression laughter. We present three patients with gelastic seizures… (More)
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Review
1982
Review
1982
Three retrospective studies were conducted to examine functional brain asymmetry in the regulation of emotion. In the first study… (More)
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