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Ganoderma boninense

 
National Institutes of Health

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2018
2018
Basal and upper stem rot of oil palm is caused by the agaricomycete Ganoderma boninense. This study investigated the transmission… Expand
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2015
2015
Basal stem rot (BSR) disease, which is caused by the fungus Ganoderma boninense, is the major disease of oil palm in Malaysia and… Expand
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Review
2013
Review
2013
The oil palm, an economically important tree, has been one of the world’s major sources of edible oil and a significant precursor… Expand
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2013
2013
Basal stem rot (BSR) is a major disease of oil palm caused by a pathogenic fungus, Ganoderma boninense. However, the interaction… Expand
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2011
2011
This study discusses the in vitro antimicrobial activity and fungitoxicity of syringic acid, caffeic acid and 4-hydroxybenzoic… Expand
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2011
2011
Ganoderma boninense is a fungus known to be pathogenic to oil palm. It causes the basal stem rot (BSR) and upper stem rot (USR… Expand
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2009
2009
This paper discusses the in vitro antimicrobial activity and fungitoxicity of syringic acid, caffeic acid and 4-hydroxybenzoic… Expand
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2009
2009
This paper discusses the in vitro synergy effect of syringic acid, caffeic acid and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid which found in oil palm… Expand
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1990
1990
Mycelial growth of boninense from floating inoculum disks incubates in flasks swirled daily was significantly more abundant than… Expand
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1986
1986
Spores of Ganoderma boninense obtained from sporulating sporophores attached to infected oil palms or infected cut stumps… Expand
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