Frontal fibrosing alopecia

 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

2006-2018
05101520062018

Papers overview

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Review
2017
Review
2017
Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is an increasingly common acquired primary scarring alopecia, first described by Kossard in 1994… (More)
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2015
2015
A 35-year-old African man developed an asymptomatic progressive recession of the frontal hairline over one year. Clinical… (More)
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2015
2015
A case of frontal fibrosing alopecia with nail involvement is presented. Nail involvement provides evidence for underlying lichen… (More)
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Review
2014
Review
2014
Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) was first described in 1994. It is characterized by scarring alopecia in bands involving the… (More)
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2014
2014
Frontal fibrosing alopecia predominantly affects postmenopausal women and is regarded as a variant of lichen planopilaris. Male… (More)
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2013
2013
Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a scarring alopecia, now an accepted subset variant of lichen planopilaris (LPP). Its… (More)
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2013
2013
INTRODUCTION Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a scarring alopecia characterized by progressive recession of the frontotemporal… (More)
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2013
2013
INTRODUCTION Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) in an entity characterized by the recession of the frontotemporal hairline (FTHL… (More)
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2010
2010
BACKGROUND In frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA), scalp alopecia dominates the clinical picture. However, eyebrow loss and hair… (More)
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2006
2006
BACKGROUND Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is an acquired scarring alopecia currently considered a clinical variant of lichen… (More)
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