Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy

Known as: ESWL, ESWL (Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy), Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy [ESWL] 
a medical procedure that uses shock waves to break up stones that form in the kidney, bladder, ureters, or gallbladder
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1955-2018
010020019552017

Papers overview

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2007
2007
INTRODUCTION Pediatric urolithiasis is relatively uncommon and limited information is available on the application of minimally… (More)
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2006
2006
PURPOSE To determine the predictors of the clinical outcome of residual fragments after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL… (More)
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
OBJECTIVES After SWL treatment, many patients have residual fragments in the kidney or ureter. Fragments </=4mm have high… (More)
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2003
2003
BACKGROUND The aim was to investigate the results of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in the management of salivary calculi… (More)
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2001
2001
OBJECTIVE To determine the causes of steinstrasse, methods of prevention and treatment strategies. PATIENTS AND METHODS Fifty… (More)
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2000
2000
BACKGROUND Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been used since the mid-1980s to fragment bile duct stones which… (More)
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1994
1994
In addition to gravity-dependent position, we suppose that other particular anatomic features may be important in the retention… (More)
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1994
1994
Clinical experience with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) has demonstrated significant variations in stone fragility… (More)
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1990
1990
Using extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) pancreatic stones may be disintegrated. Acute adverse effects directly… (More)
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1986
1986
This study was designed to compare different methods of treating renal calculi in order to establish which was the most cost… (More)
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