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Epinecrophylla fjeldsaai

Known as: Myrmotherula fjeldsaai, Myrmotherula haematonota fjeldsaai 
 
National Institutes of Health

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2016
2016
ABSTRACT  ∙ The life histories of most Epinecrophylla antwrens are poorly known. I describe the first nest and egg of the Stipple… Expand
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2014
2014
A new genus and three new species of the picobiin quill mites (Cheyletoidea: Syringophilidae) are described from passeriform… Expand
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2012
2012
Recent DNA-based phylogenetic analyses of the family Thamnophilidae have shown that the genus Myrmotherula is polyphyletic… Expand
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
SummaryFour species of understory antbirds (Formicariidae: Myrmotherula fulviventris, M. axillaris, Microrhopias quixensis, and… Expand
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2004
2004
SummaryChecker-throated antwrens (Formicariidae: Myrmotherula fulviventris) live in lowland neotropical forests and forage from… Expand
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2003
2003
The taxonomic position of a trans-Andean avian population described as Myrmotherula brachyura ignota Griscom, 1929, has existed… Expand
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2002
2002
We present significant new information on the distribution and status of 138 species of birds from the Andean East Slope of… Expand
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
Current species-level taxonomy of Neotropical birds is in need of reassessment but lacks objective methodology and criteria for… Expand
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Highly Cited
1982
Highly Cited
1982
This paper provides information on the behavior, distribution, and taxonomy of 36 species of rainforest and marsh birds found in… Expand
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