EPHA2 gene

Known as: EPHRIN RECEPTOR EphA2, ECK, EPITHELIAL CELL RECEPTOR PROTEIN-TYROSINE KINASE 
This gene plays a role in development and is upregulated in several breast carcinomas.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2011
2011
EphA2 is a member of the Eph family of receptor tyrosine kinases and is highly expressed in many aggressive cancer types… (More)
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Highly Cited
2010
Highly Cited
2010
One arising challenge in the treatment of breast cancer is the development of therapeutic resistance to trastuzumab, an antibody… (More)
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Highly Cited
2008
Highly Cited
2008
Overexpression of the receptor tyrosine kinase EPH receptor A2 (EphA2) is commonly observed in aggressive breast cancer and… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase is frequently overexpressed in different human cancers, suggesting that it may promote tumor… (More)
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
The EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase is frequently overexpressed in many cancers, including 40% of breast cancers. Here, we show… (More)
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Review
2005
Review
2005
EphA2 is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is overexpressed by many human cancers, and is often associated with poor prognostic… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
The EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in a variety of human cancers. We sought to characterize the role of EphA2 in… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
The EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in many different types of human cancers where it functions as a powerful… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Elevated levels of protein tyrosine phosphorylation contribute to a malignant phenotype, although the tyrosine kinases that are… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
The p53 tumor suppressor protein is mutated in more than 50% of all human cancers, which makes the study of its functions and… (More)
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