Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders

Known as: Do Not Resuscitate Order, DNR order, DNR orders 
A type of advance directive in which a person states that healthcare providers should not perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (restarting the heart… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Review
2014
Review
2014
BACKGROUND Do not resuscitate (DNR) orders are one of many challenging issues in end of life care. Previous research has not… (More)
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Highly Cited
2009
Highly Cited
2009
The anaerobic metabolism of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is important for growth and biofilm formation… (More)
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2008
2008
BACKGROUND There is an increased emphasis on benchmarking of trauma mortality outcomes as a measure of quality. Differences in… (More)
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2003
2003
This article examines how patients with cancer construct and legitimate do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders. Semi-structured… (More)
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2002
2002
OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of an intervention on the understanding and use of DNR orders by physicians; to assess the… (More)
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1997
1997
The purpose of this study was to determine the perspectives and opinions of terminally ill patients regarding the management of… (More)
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1996
1996
This study describes the use of do not resuscitate (DNR) orders for ICU patients in four northeastern U.S. teaching hospitals and… (More)
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1994
1994
The use and potential abuse of the do not resuscitate (DNR) order has wide-ranging ethical, legal and economic implications. A… (More)
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1994
1994
  • G. Singer
  • The Journal of the Florida Medical Association
  • 1994
CPR is a procedure from which approximately 15% of patients survive to discharge. Patients have the right to request DNR orders… (More)
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