Delayed Childbearing

Known as: Childbearing, Delayed 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1988-2012
0119882012

Papers overview

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Review
2012
Review
2012
Delayed childbearing (DC) is common in most Western countries. The average age of first-time mothers increased in United States… (More)
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1998
1998
  • Adolescence education newsletter
  • 1998
This brief article highlights the decline in adolescent pregnancy in developing countries. Findings are based on an analysis of… (More)
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Review
1997
Review
1997
Since around 1980, in countries belonging to European union the mean maternal age at birth increased by 1.5 y (from 27.1 to 28.6… (More)
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1995
1995
The media interpreted the increase in the US birth rate in the late 1980s to be a result of older women, who had delayed… (More)
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Review
1992
Review
1992
Data from the 1985 Spanish Survey of Fertility including 8789 women aged 18-49 years is used to examine the timing of 1st births… (More)
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1992
1992
Delayed childbearing among women in their 30s has been a widely accepted explanation for the dramatic increase in the total… (More)
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Review
1992
Review
1992
Analysis of the 2/1000 sample survey of fertility and birth control was conducted in order to assess the change in the crude… (More)
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1992
1992
The concern expressed is that voluntary childlessness is rare in any part of Europe, and the proportion childless today is… (More)
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Review
1991
Review
1991
  • Aleena Adam
  • Journal of the Australian Population Association
  • 1991
Data on ever-married women 15-17 and all women 18-44 from the 1986 Australian Family Formation Survey were examined for… (More)
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Review
1988
Review
1988
This paper considers whether marital instability varies by the duration between marriage and 1st birth among ever-married white… (More)
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