De Quervain Disease

Known as: de quervains tenosynovitis, Stenosing Tenosynovitis, De Quervain, De Quervain Stenosing Tenosynovitis 
Stenosing tenosynovitis of the abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis tendons in the first dorsal wrist compartment. The presenting… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2009
2009
PURPOSE De Quervain's tenosynovitis is thought to occur most frequently in women, with presentation of pain and swelling in the… (More)
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Review
2009
Review
2009
BACKGROUND De Quervain's tenosynovitis is a disorder characterised by pain on the radial (thumb) side of the wrist and functional… (More)
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Review
2006
Review
2006
Stenosing tenosynovitis, or trigger finger, is an entity seen commonly by hand surgeons. This problem generally is caused by a… (More)
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2002
2002
A new surgical treatment for De Quervain's disease is presented, in which the anatomy and function of the first dorsal… (More)
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1998
1998
The histopathological appearances of the tendon sheath and synovium from 23 patients treated surgically for de Quervain's disease… (More)
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1998
1998
In a controlled, prospective, double-blind study, the incidence of accurate injection of the abductor pollicis longus (APL) and… (More)
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1995
1995
We have studied the anatomical findings at operation on 67 patients with De Quervain's disease, 5% of whom had bilateral lesions… (More)
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1995
1995
We have studied the anatomical findings at operation on 67 patients with De Quervain's disease, 5% of whom had bilateral lesions… (More)
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1985
1985
The tendon sheaths of extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) and abductor pollicis longus (APL), obtained from four patients with de… (More)
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1959
1959
Let’s look at the anatomy of the forearm and wrist so that we can understand this problem. The muscles on the back of the forearm… (More)
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