Conway's Game of Life

Known as: QuadLife, Conway's life, Gol 
The Game of Life, also known simply as Life, is a cellular automaton devised by the British mathematician John Horton Conway in 1970. The "game" is a… (More)
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2016
2016
The complexity of the behaviour that some simple cellular automata (CA) can exhibit is clearly shown by a demonstration of… (More)
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2014
2014
Abstract The cellular automaton model of computation has drawn the interest of researchers from different disciplines including… (More)
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2011
2011
In this paper we present a Universal Turing Machine build in the Cellular Automaton Conway's Game of Life. This is an extension… (More)
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2011
2011
We present what we argue is the generic generalization of Conway's "Game of Life" to a continuous domain. We describe the… (More)
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2010
2010
Although cellular automata has origins dating from the 1950s, widespread popular interest did not develop until John Conway’s… (More)
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2010
2010
Conway's Game of Life is a popular heuristic zero-player game, devised by John Horton Conway in 1970, and it is the best-known… (More)
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2010
2010
Of the very large number of cellular automata rules in existence, a relatively small number of rules may be considered… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
This chapter describes a Turing machine built from patterns in the Conway’s Game of Life cellular automaton. It outlines the… (More)
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2000
2000
We use integer programming to find maximum density stable patterns in variants of Conway's game of Life, and we describe how to… (More)
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Highly Cited
1970
Highly Cited
1970
Most of the work of John Horton Conway, a mathematician at Gonville and Caius College of the University of Cambridge, has been in… (More)
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