Combretaceae

Known as: Indian almond family 
A plant family of the order Myrtales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida. They are mostly trees and shrubs growing in warm areas.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Review
2015
Review
2015
Plants of the genus Terminalia are amongst the most widely used plants for traditional medicinal purposes worldwide. Many species… (More)
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Review
2008
Review
2008
AIM OF THE STUDY Members of the Combretaceae family are widely traded in the traditional medicine market in southern Africa. The… (More)
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2006
2006
The dried leaves of Combretum and Terminalia species (Combretaceae) were extracted with acetone, hexane, dichloromethane and… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
Bacterial intercellular communication, or quorum sensing (QS), controls the pathogenesis of many medically important organisms… (More)
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
A serial microplate dilution method developed for bacteria was modified slightly and gave good results with several fungi. The… (More)
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2005
2005
Five species of Combretaceae growing in Togo were investigated for their antifungal activity against 20 pathogenic fungi (10… (More)
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2005
2005
A bioautography method was developed to determine the number of antifungal compounds in Terminalia species extracts. Acetone… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
Preliminary studies with Combretum erythrophyllum showed antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria… (More)
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2003
2003
Four pentacyclic tritepenes were isolated from Combretum imberbe Engl. & Diels, of which two are novel glycosidic derivatives of… (More)
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1996
1996
By means of bioassay-guided separation methods, the cancer cell growth inhibitory constituents residing in the bark, stem and… (More)
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