Celiac Artery Stenosis from Compression by Median Arcuate Ligament of Diaphragm

Known as: Median arcuate ligament syndrome, celiac axis compression syndrome, Marable's syndrome 
Compression of the celiac artery. [HPO:probinson]
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2009
2009
OBJECTIVE Celiac artery compression syndrome (CACS) is an unusual condition caused by abnormally low insertion of the median… (More)
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Review
2007
Review
2007
Celiac artery syndrome exists, although it remains controversial, and in some patients a firm diagnosis cannot be established… (More)
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2007
2007
Median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS) is a rare disorder resulting from extrinsic compression and narrowing of the celiac… (More)
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2006
2006
INTRODUCTION Controversy continues about the mere existence of the celiac artery compression syndrome. Earlier results of… (More)
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Review
2005
Review
2005
The median arcuate ligament is a fibrous arch that unites the diaphragmatic crura on either side of the aortic hiatus. The… (More)
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2003
2003
PURPOSE To measure the prevalence and degree of celiac artery compression during breath-hold imaging at end inspiration and end… (More)
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2002
2002
Several authors believe the crus of the diaphragm or the arcuate ligament is largely implicated in the etiology of the celiac… (More)
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2001
2001
In median arcuate ligament syndrome, the root of the celiac artery is compressed and narrowed by the median arcuate ligament of… (More)
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
A 43-year-old woman presented with symptomatic mesenteric ischemia caused by median arcuate ligament compression of her celiac… (More)
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1997
1997
The median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS) is characterized by abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting attributed to compression of… (More)
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