Cassiope tetragona

Known as: Cassiope tetragona (L.) D.Don, white arctic mountain heather 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1995-2017
01219952017

Papers overview

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2017
2017
Climate change may alter mycorrhizal communities, which impact ecosystem characteristics such as carbon sequestration processes… (More)
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2016
2016
Effects of climate change are predicted to be greatest at high latitudes, with more pronounced warming in winter than summer… (More)
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2015
2015
Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions are expected to change substantially because of the rapid advancement of… (More)
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2013
2013
The High Arctic winter is expected to be altered through ongoing and future climate change. Winter precipitation and snow depth… (More)
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Review
2012
Review
2012
This study was carried out on free-range backyard chickens and domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica) from December 2010 to… (More)
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2010
2010
A total of 79 chickens were randomly collected from 4 rural localities and processed to detect the presence of helminth parasites… (More)
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2005
2005
Die Jugendblätter vonNymphaea tetragona sind astomatiseh, die Folgeblätter epistomatisch. 
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2005
2005
I. Die Vakuolen der Schließzellen der Laubblätter verschiedener Nymphaeaceen färben sich in Wasserstoffsuperoxyd-Lösung orange… (More)
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1996
1996
As climatic change might induce ecophysiological changes in plants which affect their long-term performance, we investigated… (More)
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1995
1995
Previous research has shown that plant extracts, e.g. from boreal dwarf shrubs and trees, can cause reduced growth of… (More)
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