Cardamine glacialis

Known as: Cardamine glacialis (G.Forst.) DC. 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
2010
2010
BACKGROUND The production of microbial lipids has attracted considerable interest during the past decade since they can be… (More)
  • table 1
  • table 2
  • table 3
  • figure 1
  • table 4
Is this relevant?
2003
2003
Morphological investigations of motile cells and cysts of a small dinoflagellate (strain CCMP 2088) isolated from Canadian… (More)
  • table 1
  • table 2
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • table 3
Is this relevant?
2003
2003
The northern fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis) is an abundant seabird whose Northeast Atlantic population has expanded dramatically… (More)
Is this relevant?
2002
2002
Changes in growing season temperature and duration may have profound effects on the population dynamics of arctic and alpine… (More)
  • figure 1
  • table 1
  • figure 2
  • table 2
  • table 3
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
The effect of variable concentrations of dissolved molecular carbon dioxide, [CO2,aq], on C : N : P ratios in marine… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
Gammarus wilkitzkii, Apherusa glacialis, Onismus nanseni, Onismus glacialis, Boreogadus saida, Parathemisto libellula and Calanus… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 4
  • figure 6
  • figure 7
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
Halogenated methanes produced in the oceans are important as carriers of chlorine, bromine, and iodine into the atmosphere. There… (More)
  • table 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
1996
1996
Epibenthic brittle star assemblages were investigated on the northwestern Barents Sea shelf between 81° and 77°N in July 1991. At… (More)
  • figure 1
  • table 1
  • table 3
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
1982
Highly Cited
1982
At ice edges in the Canadian High Arctic, seabirds and marine mammals eat arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) and, to a lesser extent… (More)
  • figure 1
  • table 1
  • table 2
  • table 3
  • table 4
Is this relevant?