Calcium Dobesilate

Known as: Dobesilate, Calcium, Benzenesulfonic acid, 2,5-dihydroxy-, calcium salt (2:1), Calcium Dobesilate [Chemical/Ingredient] 
A drug used to reduce hemorrhage in diabetic retinopathy.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2014
2014
INTRODUCTION Calcium dobesilate is an antioxidant drug and this study is aimed to investigate the effects of calcium dobesilate… (More)
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2011
2011
OBJECTIVE To test the efficacy of calcium dobesilate (CaD) in chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). METHOD Double-blind, parallel… (More)
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Highly Cited
2010
Highly Cited
2010
OBJECTIVE Calcium dobesilate (CaD) has been used in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy in the last decades, but its mechanisms… (More)
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2006
2006
The study was carried out to confirm the effect of calcium dobesilate (CaD) compared to placebo (PLA) on the blood-retinal… (More)
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2004
2004
Calcium dobesilate stabilizes blood-retinal barrier in patients with diabetic retinopathy and possesses antioxidant properties in… (More)
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2001
2001
Calcium dobesilate possesses antioxidant properties and protects against capillary permeability by reactive oxygen species in the… (More)
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Review
1998
Review
1998
1. Calcium dobesilate (2,5-dihydroxybenzene sulfonate) is a drug commonly used in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy and… (More)
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1998
1998
Calcium dobesilate, a vascular protective agent, was tested in vitro for its scavenging action against oxygen free radicals… (More)
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1997
1997
Here we report a case of a patient in whom the administration of calcium dobesilate was associated with the development of an… (More)
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1997
1997
1. Some cardiovascular disturbances which occur in diabetics are a consequence of alterations in vascular contractility as well… (More)
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