Bombus hortorum

 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1981-2017
01219812017

Papers overview

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2017
2017
Toxic nectar is an ecological paradox [1, 2]. Plants divert substantial resources to produce nectar that attracts pollinators [3… (More)
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2015
2015
Changes in agricultural practice across Europe and North America have been associated with range contractions and local… (More)
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2012
2012
Habitat fragmentation can have severe effects on plant pollinator interactions, for example changing the foraging behaviour of… (More)
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2011
2011
Four British bumblebee species (Bombus terrestris, Bombus hortorum, Bombus ruderatus and Bombus subterraneus) became established… (More)
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Review
2011
Review
2011
bumblebee / Bombus / bivoltine / Oregon Bumblebees, Bombus spp. (Hymenoptera: Apidae), are eusocial insects that require a… (More)
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2007
2007
In three field seasons, 2003-2005, bumble bees were collected in southern Sweden and eastern Denmark in search of microsporidian… (More)
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2005
2005
Es werden Freilandbeobachtungen über normalen und anormalen Blütenbesuch vonSalvia glutinosa L. undGaleopsis speciosa Mill… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
We have found that foraging bumblebees (Bombus hortorum, B. pascuorum, B. pratorum and B.␣terrestris) not only avoid flowers of… (More)
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1997
1997
We have found that foraging bumblebees (Bombus hortorum, B. pascuorum, B. pratorum and B. terrestris) not only avoid ̄owers of… (More)
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1981
1981
Wasps (Dolichovespula and Vespula spp.) worked predominantly upwards when foraging for nectar on inflorescences of the… (More)
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