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Arvicolinae

Known as: Arvicoline, Microtine, Microtinae 
A subfamily of MURIDAE found nearly world-wide and consisting of about 20 genera. Voles, lemmings, and muskrats are members.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
Voles of the genus Microtus represent one of the most speciose mammalian genera in the Holarctic. We established a molecular… Expand
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
SummaryWe studied responses of stoats and least weasels to fluctuating vole abundances during seven winters in western Finland… Expand
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Availability of food may play a number of different dynamical roles in rodent–vegetation systems. Consideration of a suite of… Expand
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
Cycles characterize the demography of many populations of microtine rodents and snowshoe hares. A phase of low numbers often… Expand
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
Current ecological information on periodically fluctuating microtine populations are demonstrated to support a hypothesis… Expand
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Highly Cited
1995
Highly Cited
1995
The patterns of density dependence in Fennoscandian rodents are investigated statistically using a linear autoregressive scheme… Expand
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Highly Cited
1994
Highly Cited
1994
Central vasopressin pathways have been implicated in the mediation of paternal behavior, selective aggression, and affiliation in… Expand
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Highly Cited
1993
Highly Cited
1993
THE four-year cycle of microtine rodents in boreal and arctic regions was first described in 1924 (ref. 1). Competing hypotheses… Expand
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Highly Cited
1985
Highly Cited
1985
SummaryMicrotine rodents are known to show extreme population variations (cycles) but non-cyclic populations have also been… Expand
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Highly Cited
1969
Highly Cited
1969
Microtus pennsylvanicus and M. ochrogaster are sympatric in southern Indiana grasslands. From June 1965 to August 1967 four… Expand
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