Apparent mineralocorticoid excess

Known as: AME, AME1, Cortisol 11-beta-ketoreductase deficiency 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Review
2001
Review
2001
Apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) is a potentially fatal genetic disorder causing severe juvenile hypertension, pre- and… (More)
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2000
2000
Apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) syndrome is a rare inherited disorder caused by 11β- hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11-HSD… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
Apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) is a genetic disorder causing pre- and postnatal growth failure, juvenile hypertension… (More)
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Review
1997
Review
1997
Whereas aldosterone is normally a much stronger mineralocorticoid than cortisol in vivo, mineralocorticoid receptors have… (More)
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Review
1997
Review
1997
Aldosterone, the most important mineralocorticoid, regulates electrolyte excretion and intravascular volume mainly through its… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
BACKGROUND 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11 beta-HSD) catalyses the interconversion of hormonally active cortisol to… (More)
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Review
1996
Review
1996
The syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) is a heritable form of hypertension due to an inborn error of cortisol… (More)
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1994
1994
The syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) is currently understood to reflect impaired peripheral metabolism of… (More)
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Review
1994
Review
1994
In 1979, Ulick and New first coined the term Apparent Mineralocorticoid Excess (AME) for a syndrome of hypertension, hypokalaemia… (More)
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1987
1987
We report two female siblings (ages 4 and 9 years) and one 8-year-old male with the syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess… (More)
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