Antifreeze Proteins

Known as: Antifreeze Peptides, Antifreeze Proteins [Chemical/Ingredient], Proteins, Antifreeze 
Proteins that bind to ice and modify the growth of ice crystals. They perform a cryoprotective role in a variety of organisms.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2011
Highly Cited
2011
The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) bind to the surface of ice crystals and lower the non-equilibrium freezing temperature of the icy… (More)
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Review
2004
Review
2004
Antifreeze proteins are found in a wide range of overwintering plants where they inhibit the growth and recrystallization of ice… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a structurally diverse group of proteins that have the ability to modify ice crystal structure and… (More)
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Review
2002
Review
2002
Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) help organisms to survive below 0 degrees C by inhibiting ice growth. Although AFPs are structurally… (More)
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Review
2002
Review
2002
High-resolution three-dimensional structures are now available for four of seven non-homologous fish and insect antifreeze… (More)
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Review
2001
Review
2001
Marine teleosts at high latitudes can encounter ice-laden seawater that is approximately 1 degrees C colder than the colligative… (More)
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Review
2001
Review
2001
Terrestrial arthropods survive subzero temperatures by becoming either freeze tolerant (survive body fluid freezing) or freeze… (More)
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
Insect antifreeze proteins (AFP) are much more effective than fish AFPs at depressing solution freezing points by ice-growth… (More)
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
Insect antifreeze proteins (AFP) are considerably more active at inhibiting ice crystal growth than AFP from fish or plants… (More)
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