Antheraea polyphemus

 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1970-2014
051019702014

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2009
Highly Cited
2009
Male moths respond to conspecific female-released pheromones with remarkable sensitivity and specificity, due to highly… (More)
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2004
2004
Pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) located in the antennae of male moth species play an important role in olfaction. They are… (More)
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2003
2003
Binding properties of six heterologously expressed pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) identified in the silkmoths Antheraea… (More)
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2002
2002
We have investigated the structural features of three pheromone binding protein (PBP) subtypes from Antheraea polyphemus and… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs), located in the sensillum lymph of pheromone-responsive antennal hairs, are thought to… (More)
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2001
2001
SNMP-1 (sensory neuron membrane protein 1) is an olfactory-specific membrane-bound protein which is homologous with the CD36… (More)
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2000
2000
Females of the sibling silkmoth species Antheraea polyphemus and A. pernyi use the same three sex pheromone components in… (More)
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1990
1990
Female moths produce blends of odorant chemicals, called pheromones. These precise chemical mixtures both attract males and… (More)
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Highly Cited
1985
Highly Cited
1985
Behavioral and electrophysiological evidence has suggested that sex pheromone is rapidly inactivated within the sensory hairs… (More)
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Highly Cited
1981
Highly Cited
1981
The antennae of male silk moths are extremely sensitive to the female sex pheromone such that a male moth can find a female up to… (More)
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