Amanita phalloides

Known as: Amanita phalloides Fruiting Body, Death Cap 
A type of poisonous mushroom that has harmful effects on the kidneys and liver. It is responsible for most fatal cases of mushroom poisoning.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2015
2015
Most of the fatal cases of mushroom poisoning are caused by Amanita phalloides. The amount of toxin in mushroom varies according… (More)
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Review
2015
Review
2015
Amanita phalloides, also known as 'death cap', is one of the most poisonous mushrooms, being involved in the majority of human… (More)
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2012
2012
Mushroom poisoning is a relatively rare cause of acute liver failure (ALF). The present paper analyzes the pathogenesis, clinical… (More)
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2011
2011
A Vietnamese family living in the Pacific Northwest harvested several wild mushrooms grown in their front lawn. All three in the… (More)
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2009
2009
The deadly poisonous Amanita phalloides is common along the west coast of North America. Death cap mushrooms are especially… (More)
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Review
2009
Review
2009
Amanita phalloides is the most dangerous, poisonous mushroom species in our climatic conditions. It is the cause of 90-95% of all… (More)
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1996
1996
The aim of the present study was to show the therapeutic effect of silibinin dihemisuccinate in a case of intoxication by… (More)
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1984
1984
A single oral dose of the lyophilized deathcap fungus Amanita phalloides (85 mg/kg body wt) caused gastrointestinal signs of… (More)
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1983
1983
1 A total of 18 cases of Amanita phalloides intoxication was treated by combined chemotherapy during 1980 and 1981. After… (More)
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1982
1982
In the fall of 1981 the San Francisco Bay Area Regional Poison Control Center received more than 100 calls regarding wild… (More)
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