Absidia (fungus)

Known as: ABSIDIA, Absidias 
A genus of filamentous fungi within the family Mucoraceae that are ubiquitous in nature and may cause mucormycosis in humans.
National Institutes of Health

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Highly Cited
2016
Highly Cited
2016
Notes on 113 fungal taxa are compiled in this paper, including 11 new genera, 89 new species, one new subspecies, three new… (More)
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2010
2010
The zygomycete genus Lichtheimia (syn. Absidia pro parte, Mycocladus) consists of saprotrophic fungi inhabiting soil or dead… (More)
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2008
2008
This study was aimed to estimate the mycoflora and aflatoxin contamination of smoked dried fishes of Stock (Gadus morhua), Skip… (More)
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2008
2008
The diversity of fungi and bacteria associated with traditional Vietnamese alcohol fermentation starters (banh men) was… (More)
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
The genus Absidia comprises ubiquitously distributed soil fungi inhabiting different growth temperature optima ranging from 20-42… (More)
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Review
2000
Review
2000
The Zygomycetes represent relatively uncommon isolates in the clinical laboratory, reflecting either environmental contaminants… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
The level of toxigenic moulds and mycotoxins were analyzed in 62 samples of medicinal plant material and 11 herbal tea samples… (More)
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1995
1995
Chitin deacetylase, which releases the acetyl groups of glycol chitin was purified from a fungus, Absidia coerulea, and… (More)
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Highly Cited
1994
Highly Cited
1994
Within the past decade, the potential of metal biosorption has been well established. For economic reasons, of particular… (More)
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Highly Cited
1971
Highly Cited
1971
Growth of colonies of Rhizopus stolonifer, Mucor racemosus, Actinomucor repens, Absidia glauca, Geotrichum lactis, Penicillium… (More)
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