optix Drives the Repeated Convergent Evolution of Butterfly Wing Pattern Mimicry

@article{Reed2011optixDT,
  title={optix Drives the Repeated Convergent Evolution of Butterfly Wing Pattern Mimicry},
  author={Robert D. Reed and Riccardo Papa and Arnaud Martin and Heather M. Hines and Brian A. Counterman and Carolina Pardo-Diaz and Chris D. Jiggins and Nicola L. Chamberlain and Marcus R. Kronforst and Rui Chen and Georg Halder and H. Frederik Nijhout and William O. McMillan},
  journal={Science},
  year={2011},
  volume={333},
  pages={1137 - 1141}
}
Heliconius butterfly wing pattern mimicry is driven by cis-regulatory variation of the optix gene. Mimicry—whereby warning signals in different species evolve to look similar—has long served as a paradigm of convergent evolution. Little is known, however, about the genes that underlie the evolution of mimetic phenotypes or to what extent the same or different genes drive such convergence. Here, we characterize one of the major genes responsible for mimetic wing pattern evolution in Heliconius… Expand
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