fMRI reveals reciprocal inhibition between social and physical cognitive domains

@article{Jack2013fMRIRR,
  title={fMRI reveals reciprocal inhibition between social and physical cognitive domains},
  author={Anthony I. Jack and Abigail J. Dawson and Katelyn L. Begany and Regina L. Leckie and Kevin P. Barry and Angela H. Ciccia and Abraham Z. Snyder},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2013},
  volume={66},
  pages={385-401}
}
Two lines of evidence indicate that there exists a reciprocal inhibitory relationship between opposed brain networks. First, most attention-demanding cognitive tasks activate a stereotypical set of brain areas, known as the task-positive network and simultaneously deactivate a different set of brain regions, commonly referred to as the task negative or default mode network. Second, functional connectivity analyses show that these same opposed networks are anti-correlated in the resting state… 
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