fMRI Studies of Stroop Tasks Reveal Unique Roles of Anterior and Posterior Brain Systems in Attentional Selection

@article{Banich2000fMRISO,
  title={fMRI Studies of Stroop Tasks Reveal Unique Roles of Anterior and Posterior Brain Systems in Attentional Selection},
  author={Marie T. Banich and Michael Peter Milham and Ruth Ann Atchley and Neal J. Cohen and Andrew G. Webb and Tracey Mencio Wszalek and Arthur F. Kramer and Z Liang and Alexander Wright and Joel I. Shenker and Richard L. Magin},
  journal={Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
  year={2000},
  volume={12},
  pages={988-1000}
}
The brain's attentional system identifies and selects information that is task-relevant while ignoring information that is task-irrelevant. In two experiments using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined the effects of varying task-relevant information compared to task-irrelevant information. In the first experiment, we compared patterns of activation as attentional demands were increased for two Stroop tasks that differed in the task-relevant information, but not the task… Expand
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