• Corpus ID: 49350977

eview erotonin , tryptophan metabolism and the brain-gut-microbiome axis

@inproceedings{OMahonya2014eviewE,
  title={eview erotonin , tryptophan metabolism and the brain-gut-microbiome axis},
  author={. M. O’Mahonya and G. Clarkea and Y. E. Borrea and T. G. Dinana and J. F. Cryana},
  year={2014}
}
The brain-gut axis is a bidirectional communication system between the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract. Serotonin functions as a key neurotransmitter at both terminals of this network. Accumulating evidence points to a critical role for the gut microbiome in regulating normal functioning of this axis. In particular, it is becoming clear that the microbial influence on tryptophan metabolism and the serotonergic system may be an important node in such regulation. There is… 

Figures and Tables from this paper

Crosstalk Between Intestinal Serotonergic System and Pattern Recognition Receptors on the Microbiota–Gut–Brain Axis
TLDR
This review will mainly discuss serotonergic system modulation by microbiota as a pathway of communication between intestinal microbes and the body on the microbiota–gut–brain axis, and explore novel therapeutic approaches for GI diseases and mental disorders.
Role of Microbiota and Tryptophan Metabolites in the Remote Effect of Intestinal Inflammation on Brain and Depression
TLDR
It is discussed how intestinal bacteria and their metabolites can orchestrate gut-associated neuroimmune mechanisms that influence mood and behavior leading to depression, and the implications in shifting the tryptophan metabolism towards kynurenine biosynthesis while disrupting the serotonergic signaling are investigated.
A gut (microbiome) feeling about the brain
TLDR
Understanding the mechanisms by which the bacterial commensals of the authors' gut are involved in brain function may lead to the development of novel microbiome-based therapies for these mood and behavioral disorders.
Amino Acid Trp: The Far Out Impacts of Host and Commensal Tryptophan Metabolism
TLDR
It is demonstrated that tryptophan represents a key intra-kingdom signaling molecule that is able to signal onto xenobiotic receptors, including AHR, to elicit tolerogenic effects.
The Endocannabinoid System: A Bridge between Alzheimer’s Disease and Gut Microbiota
TLDR
The aim of this review is to provide a general overview on the role of both the eCB system and the microbiome gut-brain axis in AD and to suggest possible mechanisms that underlie the potential interplay of these two systems.
A Healthy Gut for a Healthy Brain: Preclinical, Clinical and Regulatory Aspects
TLDR
The present review reports some regulatory considerations regarding the use of probiotics, illustrating the most debated issues about the possibility of considering probiotics not only as a food supplement but also as a “full” medicinal product.
The Role of The Gut Microbiome in Parkinson’s Disease
TLDR
The relationship between gut microbiota and Parkinson’s Disease, which has a growing body of literature, and potential treatment and supplementation to modify the microbiota are examined.
Comprehensive Bibliometric Analysis of the Kynurenine Pathway in Mood Disorders: Focus on Gut Microbiota Research
TLDR
A comprehensive bibliometric analysis of publications relating to the KP in MD provides an updated perspective on research associated with the KP, with a focus on the current status of GM research in this field.
Effects of Coffee and Its Components on the Gastrointestinal Tract and the Brain–Gut Axis
TLDR
A narrative review provides an overview of the effect of coffee brew; its by-products; and its components on the gastrointestinal mucosa, the neural and non-neural components of the gut wall responsible for its motor function, and the brain–gut axis.
Recognizing Depression from the Microbiota–Gut–Brain Axis
TLDR
Depression is closely related with the health condition of the brain–gut axis, and maintaining/restoring the normal condition of gut microbiota helps in the prevention/therapy of mental disorders.
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 248 REFERENCES
The microbiome-gut-brain axis during early life regulates the hippocampal serotonergic system in a sex-dependent manner
TLDR
It is demonstrated that CNS neurotransmission can be profoundly disturbed by the absence of anormal gut microbiota and that this aberrant neurochemical, but not behavioural, profile is resistant to restoration of a normal gut flora in later life.
Brain–Gut–Microbe Communication in Health and Disease
TLDR
The evidence supporting a role for the enteric flora in brain–gut axis disorders is explored with the spotlight on the clinical relevance for irritable bowel syndrome, a stress-related functional gastrointestinal disorder.
The microbiome‐gut‐brain axis: from bowel to behavior
  • J. Cryan, S. O'Mahony
  • Biology, Medicine
    Neurogastroenterology and motility : the official journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society
  • 2011
TLDR
It is shown that germ‐free mice display alterations in stress‐responsivity, central neurochemistry and behavior indicative of a reduction in anxiety in comparison to conventional mice, offering the enticing proposition that specific modulation of the enteric microbiota may be a useful strategy for stress‐related disorders and for modulating the co‐morbid aspects of gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease.
Minireview: Gut microbiota: the neglected endocrine organ.
TLDR
The concept that the gut microbiota serves as a virtual endocrine organ arises from a number of important observations and it is tempting to speculate that therapeutic targeting of the Gut microbiota may be useful in treating stress-related disorders and metabolic diseases.
Regulation of the stress response by the gut microbiota: Implications for psychoneuroendocrinology
TLDR
Increasing data from patients with irritable bowel syndrome and major depression indicate that in these syndromes alteration of the HPA may be induced by increased gut permeability, and the increased permeability can respond to probiotic therapy.
Melancholic microbes: a link between gut microbiota and depression?
  • T. Dinan, J. Cryan
  • Biology, Medicine
    Neurogastroenterology and motility : the official journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society
  • 2013
TLDR
Evidence is demonstrated that there is a distinct perturbation of the composition of gut microbiota in animal models of depression and chronic stress, which has direct implications for the development of psychobiotic‐based therapeutic strategies for psychiatric disorders.
Mind-altering microorganisms: the impact of the gut microbiota on brain and behaviour
TLDR
The emerging concept of a microbiota–gut–brain axis suggests that modulation of the gut microbiota may be a tractable strategy for developing novel therapeutics for complex CNS disorders.
The microbiota and the gut-brain axis: insights from the temporal and spatial mucosal alterations during colonisation of the germfree mouse intestine.
TLDR
A functional microbiota-neurohumoral relationship during conventionalisation is supported and a delayed neuronal response that is elicited only after the microbiota accommodating homeostasis has been accomplished is suggested.
Principles and clinical implications of the brain–gut–enteric microbiota axis
TLDR
Enterochromaffin cells are important bidirectional transducers that regulate communication between the gut lumen and the nervous system, and may have an important role in pain and immune-response modulation, control of background emotions and other homeostatic functions.
The interplay between the intestinal microbiota and the brain
TLDR
How this extended communication system might influence a broad spectrum of diseases, including irritable bowel syndrome, psychiatric disorders and demyelinating conditions such as multiple sclerosis is reviewed.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...