d‐Amino acids in the brain: d‐serine in neurotransmission and neurodegeneration

@article{Wolosker2008dAminoAI,
  title={d‐Amino acids in the brain: d‐serine in neurotransmission and neurodegeneration},
  author={Herman Wolosker and Elena Dumin and Livia Balan and Veronika N Foltyn},
  journal={The FEBS Journal},
  year={2008},
  volume={275}
}
The mammalian brain contains unusually high levels of d‐serine, a d‐amino acid previously thought to be restricted to some bacteria and insects. In the last few years, studies from several groups have demonstrated that d‐serine is a physiological co‐agonist of the N‐methyl d‐aspartate (NMDA) type of glutamate receptor – a key excitatory neurotransmitter receptor in the brain. d‐Serine binds with high affinity to a co‐agonist site at the NMDA receptors and, along with glutamate, mediates several… Expand

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An overview of the current knowledge of the metabolism of D-serine in human brain at the molecular and cellular levels, with a specific emphasis on the brain localization and regulatory pathways of D -serine, serine racemase, and D-amino acid oxidase is presented. Expand
Metabolism of the neuromodulator d-serine
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