bioRxiv: the preprint server for biology

@article{Sever2019bioRxivTP,
  title={bioRxiv: the preprint server for biology},
  author={Richard Sever and Ted Roeder and Samantha Hindle and Linda Sussman and K. Black and Janet Argentine and Wayne Manos and John Inglis},
  journal={bioRxiv},
  year={2019}
}
The traditional publication process delays dissemination of new research, often by months, sometimes by years. Preprint servers decouple dissemination of research papers from their evaluation and certification by journals, allowing researchers to share work immediately, receive feedback from a much larger audience, and provide evidence of productivity long before formal publication. Launched in 2013 as a non-profit community service, the bioRxiv server has brought preprint practice to the life… 
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