Zoomorphic Astrolabes and the Introduction of Arabic Star Names into Europe

@article{Gingerich1987ZoomorphicAA,
  title={Zoomorphic Astrolabes and the Introduction of Arabic Star Names into Europe},
  author={O. Gingerich},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={1987},
  volume={500}
}
  • O. Gingerich
  • Published 1987
  • Art
  • Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • N THE WINTER of 1966/67 the short-lived Smithsonian Journal of History I featured on its cover a splendid 14th-century English astrolabe with an unusual rete filled with animal heads (PLATE 1). According to the caption, the stars on this astrolabe were indicated by pointers ”shaped in the form of dragon’s teeth.” Dragon’s teeth they were not! Perhaps dog’s tongues? In any event, my curiosity was piqued concerning zoomorphic astrolabes, and for a long time I have been on the lookout for them… CONTINUE READING
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