Zero-valent sulphur is a key intermediate in marine methane oxidation

@article{Milucka2012ZerovalentSI,
  title={Zero-valent sulphur is a key intermediate in marine methane oxidation},
  author={Jana Milucka and Timothy G. Ferdelman and Lubos Polerecky and Daniela Franzke and Gunter Wegener and Markus C. Schmid and Ingo Lieberwirth and Michael Wagner and Friedrich Widdel and Marcel M M Kuypers},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2012},
  volume={491},
  pages={541-546}
}
Emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, from marine sediments are controlled by anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled primarily to sulphate reduction (AOM). Sulphate-coupled AOM is believed to be mediated by a consortium of methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulphate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria but the underlying mechanism has not yet been resolved. Here we show that zero-valent sulphur compounds (S0) are formed during AOM through a new pathway for dissimilatory sulphate reduction… Expand
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