Z LINKAGE OF FEMALE PROMISCUITY GENES IN THE MOTH UTETHEISA ORNATRIX: SUPPORT FOR THE SEXY‐SPERM HYPOTHESIS?

@article{Iyengar2010ZLO,
  title={Z LINKAGE OF FEMALE PROMISCUITY GENES IN THE MOTH UTETHEISA ORNATRIX: SUPPORT FOR THE SEXY‐SPERM HYPOTHESIS?},
  author={Vikram K. Iyengar and H. Kern Reeve},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2010},
  volume={64}
}
Female preference genes for large males in the highly promiscuous moth Utetheisa ornatrix (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) have previously been shown to be mostly Z‐linked, in accordance with the hypothesis that ZZ–ZW sex chromosome systems should facilitate Fisherian sexual selection. We determined the heritability of both female and male promiscuity in the highly promiscuous moth U. ornatrix (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) through parent–offspring and grandparent–offspring regression analyses. Our data show… 

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