Your word against mine: How a rebel language and script of the Philippines was created, suppressed, recovered and contested

@article{Kelly2012YourWA,
  title={Your word against mine: How a rebel language and script of the Philippines was created, suppressed, recovered and contested},
  author={Piers Kelly},
  journal={The Australian Journal of Anthropology},
  year={2012},
  volume={23},
  pages={357-378}
}
  • Piers Kelly
  • Published 1 December 2012
  • History
  • The Australian Journal of Anthropology
When news of an uncontacted ‘lost tribe’ began emanating from the island of Bohol in the southern Philippines, visitors were fascinated by the group's unique language and complex writing system, used today by some five hundred people in limited domains. Though few persons have attempted to analyse the language—known today as Eskayan—exotic theories of its origins are widely circulated by outsiders. However, according to speakers, Eskayan was created by the ancestor Pinay who used the human body… Expand
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The Eskaya people of Bohol in the southern Philippines use the Eskayan language and script in specific domains: schooling, church, speechmaking and literary transcription. Both language and scriptExpand
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