YouTube versus the National Film and Sound Archive: Which Is the More Useful Resource for Historians of Australian Television?

@article{McKee2011YouTubeVT,
  title={YouTube versus the National Film and Sound Archive: Which Is the More Useful Resource for Historians of Australian Television?},
  author={A. McKee},
  journal={Television & New Media},
  year={2011},
  volume={12},
  pages={154 - 173}
}
  • A. McKee
  • Published 2011
  • Geography, Sociology
  • Television & New Media
This article compares YouTube and the National Film and Sound Archive (NFSA) as resources for television historians interested in viewing old Australian television programs. The author searched for seventeen important television programs, identified in a previous research project, to compare what was available in the two archives and how easy it was to find. The analysis focused on differences in curatorial practices of accessioning and cataloguing. NFSA is stronger in current affairs and older… Expand
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