You say tomato? Collaborative remembering leads to more false memories for intimate couples than for strangers

@article{French2008YouST,
  title={You say tomato? Collaborative remembering leads to more false memories for intimate couples than for strangers},
  author={L. French and M. Garry and K. Mori},
  journal={Memory},
  year={2008},
  volume={16},
  pages={262 - 273}
}
Research on memory conformity shows that collaborative remembering—typically in the form of discussion—can influence people's memories. One question that remains is whether it matters with whom we discuss our memories. To address this question we compared people's memories for an event after they discussed that event with either their romantic partner or a stranger. Pairs of subjects watched slightly different versions of a movie, and then discussed some details from the movie, but not others… Expand

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